Category Archives: Bible Activities

Bible activities are an extremely effective method for reinforcing Biblical truths and helping to engage your students in embracing God’s word.

Every Sunday School Room Needs A Costume Box!

Remember that old quotation, “Never judge a man unless you walk two moons in his moccasins.”  True as it may be, asking children to step out of their life and into one of a Biblical character is like asking them to become part of a fairy tale.  

The Bible is full of interesting narratives, but unless the children understand the feelings and the problems facing these characters, the stories have no meaning.  One of the biggest jobs of a Sunday school teacher is to make children understand what the Biblical characters were experiencing.  The difference in dress, the difference in the times and travel only add to the problem.  One of the best ways to overcome these difficulties is to have the children become that Biblical character.  A costume box does more to accomplish this than all the lessons in history. 

The mere suggestion of a costume is all that is necessary to work its magic.  A remnant, sixty inches long and twenty-five wide is ideal, but children‘s imaginations spring to life with much smaller pieces.  The women wear these over their head so that it serves as a headdress and a shawl, while the men wear a smaller version on their head, held in place with a kerchief, and the standard size draped over a shoulder.  A shepherd’s staff is a favorite part of a costume and extended canes are not too difficult to create.  Styrofoam Christmas canes also work when they are extended and the red stripe hidden.  

Before the children enact the story they have just heard, it’s imperative to talk about the problems the characters are facing.  Many of these were not even mentioned in the story.  Water for example.  In many cases they had to bring enough water for the journey.  If they were hungry, there were no McDonalds to satisfy their appetites, and food for the entire journey had to be carried with them.  They also needed blankets for sleeping under the stars.  But they couldn’t pile all this into the trunk of a car and drive off.   A myriad of supplies were loaded onto a donkey, if they were lucky enough to have one.  Otherwise, they carried everything themselves.  

Creating a Bible Skit

As the children enact the story, you will begin to see in their walk, their stance and their voice, that they are experiencing some of the emotions shared by the character.   Rather than have them memorize the dialogue, let them use their own words, and you may be surprised by the results.  Don’t be afraid to prompt them with a few words now and then to keep them on track.

One teacher explained that the results were so outstanding they invited the class next door to come in and see a repeat performance.  “The guest class enjoyed it so much,” she said, “that they enacted their Christian skit the following week and invited us.”

There are many ways to fill a costume box at little or no expense.   Pay a visit to the local thrift store; find sheets and curtains and drapes to be cut up.  Contacting drapery companies is also a good starting place. Most are willing to save remnants for a good cause, and to the average business man, any church event fits this category.   A thank you note from you with pictures the children have drawn of themselves wearing a costume will cement a good relationship.  And in this day and age, an email with pictures taken on a digital camera of students playing the part in costume is worth a thousand thank you notes.   Avoid prints, but stripes, like Joseph’s coat of many colors, will work for the wealthy or royalty.

The costume box itself should be special enough to be a featured object in the room.  It’s not necessary to buy the plastic storage kind sold by most stores after Christmas.   A cardboard box from a grocery store will be perfect if it’s covered with pictures of Bible story lessons, and a big gold star on top gives it a final touch.  You’ll find your costume box is invaluable in teaching a lesson and making your Bible characters believable.  In addition, it will give every child hours of pleasure as they dress up and relive those Bible stories until they know them by heart. 

Bible Trivia – A Great Sunday School Activity for Kids

To many people fun Bible trivia for kids is a way to kill time or to entertain the children. However Bible trivia does a lot more than entertain.  It reinforces what the children have already learned, and it teaches them more.  Some research shows that when kids are presented facts in competition, they learn more quickly and retain more subject matter than through school memorization or wrote.  Bible Trivia is a fun way to prepare kids for real life with stories from real-life history.

Even Preschoolers Can Compete at Bible Trivia

Bible activity
To many people fun Bible trivia for kids is a way to kill time or to entertain the children. However Bible trivia does a lot more than entertain.

You can start teaching kids by using Bible trivia at a very young age.  Most preschoolers who regularly attend Sunday school know the stories of Noah, Jonah, David & Goliath and a few others.  Doing Bible trivia questions with kids will help prepare them for the types of testing that await them in school—and in a fun way.  Bible trivia contests also provide an opportunity to reinforce the exciting details of what they’ve learned in Sunday school. 

Finally, trivia for kids provides a great opportunity to compare biblical heroes with people of today.  Show them a trivia question that asks, “which Bible heroes were called by God and asked in terror, “why me??”  That’s a great opportunity to share how ancient heroes were just as scared as we are to do brave things. Trivia questions can help kids believe that God can use them too!

Here’s an easy bible trivia contest  

Below is a Bible Trivia Contest for kids as young as four but will work for those new to our faith of any age.  If you use it remember praise, praise, praise!  Praise for correct answers is just as good as a prize (thought prizes wouldn’t hurt either)!

Quiz

(Is the correct answer A, B. or C.)

1.  Who was the baby whose mother placed him in a basket and hid him in the bulrushes?

A.  Cain.    B. Moses.   C. Daniel.

2.  What did God tell Noah to build?

        A.  A statue.   B.  A chariot.   C.  An Ark.

3.  To whom did God give the Ten Commandments?

        A. Moses.  B. Saul.  C. King Solomon.

4.  What sign did God give to Noah after the flood?.  

A.  A star.   B.  An angel.  C. A rainbow.

5.  Who slew the giant Goliath?.  

        A. David.  B. Gideon.  C. Sampson. 

6.  Which of these men wanted to know, “Why me?” when God called on them to do something?

        A.  Moses and Gideon   B.  Jonah and Saul.  3.  All of them.

7.  How did David kill the giant?

        A.  With his slingshot.   B.  With his sword.   C.  With poison.  

8.  When the Israelites were hungry in the desert, how did God feed them?  

A. With Burnt Offerings.  B.  With Manna that fell from the sky.  C.  He filled their nets with fish.  

9.  In which book of the Bible is God not mentioned even once?

A. Micha.  B.  Esther.  C.  Malachi. 

10.   What happened to Jonah when God asked him to do something and he tried to run away?  

        A. He was thrown into the lions den.   B. He was swallowed by a whale.  C. He was thrown into the firey furnace.

 The Bible has an endless number of subjects and characters that can be turned into trivia contests for kids.  The Ten Commandments, the beatitudes, the disciples, the New Testament, The Christmas story, the Easter story and many others can be learned easily…especially if there is lots of praise and a prize at the end! 

Quiz Answers

(With the correct answer underlined and in bold.)

1.  Who was the baby whose mother placed him in a basket and hid him in the bulrushes?

A.  Cain,    B. Moses,   C, Daniel

2.  What did God tell Noah to build?

        A.  A statue.   B.  A chariot.   C.  An Ark.

3.  To whom did God give the Ten Commandments?

        A. Moses, B. Saul, C. King Solomon?

4.  What sign did God give to Noah after the flood?.  

A.  A star.   B.  An angel.  C. A rainbow.

5.  Who slew the giant Goliath?.  

        A. David.  B. Gideon.  C. Sampson 

6.  Which of these men wanted to know, “Why me? when God called on them to do something?

        A.  Moses and Gideon   B.  Jonah and Saul.  3.  All of them.

7.  How did David kill the giant?

        A. With his slingshot.   B.  With his sword.   C.  With poison.  

8.  When the Israelites were hungry, how did God feed them.  

A. With Burnt Offerings.  B.  With Manna that fell from the sky.  C.  He filled their nets with fish.  

  1. In which book of the Bible is God not mentioned once?

A. Micha.  B.  Esther.  C.  Malachi. 

10.   What happened to Jonah when God asked him to do something and he tried to run away?  

        A. He was thrown into the lions den.   B. He was swallowed by a whale.  C. He was thrown into the firey furnace.

Teen Bible Study Ideas

The most exciting Teen Bible study ideas come directly from the newspaper or news reports.  It’s probably best that they do, because these stories are at the top of the teenager’s list of concerns and deal with issues they are facing every day.  

Teenagers still have one foot in their childhood and one in adulthood, and since most have spent three fourths of their lives in school, they’ve had enough.  If they can find a way to avoid another class, they’ll jump at the chance and there will be no one to attend the Bible study.  Before you start looking for teen Bible study ideas, you must accomplish three things:

  • Grab the teenager’s attention.
  • Hold their attention. 
  • Make them want to come back for the next session.  

How do you grab a teenager’s attention.  

There is one crucial difference between an adult audience and a teenage one.  Adults are willing to give a speaker a chance, but if you let a teenager think for one minute that this is another lesson, you will lose him before you start.  The first rule for teenagers is to avoid, at all costs, a classroom atmosphere.

Instead of chairs in a row and the speaker at the front of the room, use a round table with a seat for the discussion leader among the students.   Have sodas available, and a snack to which they can help themselves.  If you have a portable microwave that you could bring into the room to pop popcorn, you have won one battle.  Who ever heard of a classroom that smelled like a movie theater? If you don’t have a portable microwave, a bag of popcorn from the supermarket is better than nothing.  

Open with an icebreaker

 

teen bible study
Try using an icebreaker to get your teen bible study started

An icebreaker is a trick that most public speakers use to win an audience. It consists of an antidote or a story that will make the audience laugh, and if it pokes fun at the speaker, you’ve won them, and that’s exactly what you want.  

Make them want to come back next week. 

You can’t make teenagers do anything, but you can make them want to do something, and this is where your preparation and presentation become paramount.  The secret, strange as it may seem, is not to lecture and to speak as little as possible.  The magic formula is to let the teenagers do the talking.  Ask questions.  Their answers  will reveal the facts far better than any lecture.

How do you choose topics for a teen Bible study?  

If it’s been in the news, it’s a hot topic, and bullies and bullying have certainly made the news.   There are even commercials that stress the importance of kindness and passing it on. 

Going online and google-ing the heading, News articles about bullies in schools, will bring up ten pages of examples ranging from the Fox News report on March 29, 2010: Nine Charged in Bullying of Massachusetts Teen Who Killed Herself, to the CBS news report on April 4, 2010, Bullying: Do Schools Need a New approach?

Other great teen issues include how to abstain from drugs, drinking and sex. “Just say no” and other mottos don’t really cut it.  Cite examples of kids who don’t succumb in tough situations, and details of the means with which they did it.  As with any great lesson, greatness lies in the details.  Those subjects alone could take up a couple of seasons, but there’s also modesty, the value of planning ahead (they notoriously don’t), getting to know Jesus as a Person and not a religion, the hazards of gossip.  Finally, as most teens love a great suspense tail, theirs is a great age to introduce the apocalyptic books and how they may relate to today’s events. 

How do we tie topics into a Bible Study?

This is where the teacher’s preparation is crucial.  Scriptures and parables that lead the teenagers into a discussion related to the subject will make or break your Bible Study, so have a generous supply of these tools at your fingertips. 

Bringing in scripture always sows seeds.  It also makes the Bible a relevant and powerful book as opposed to an archaic, dusty old book that their parents read.  There  are so many great web sites including Biblios.com and Bible Gateway to lead teachers to great scriptures.  If a teacher simply types “[issue] scriptures,” such as “teenage drinking scriptures,” you often come up with a host of worthy articles to scour.

If a problem in your area made the local news, but not the national, be sure to include it in your study.  Teenagers, while taking that final step to adulthood, need guidance more than ever.  They are still young, impressionable and inexperienced, so your discussions along with Biblical reinforcement can play a leading role  while they are choosing the direction of their lives.  Be sure to include such a topic in your Teen Bible Study Ideas.