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Bible Trivia – A Great Sunday School Activity for Kids

To many people fun Bible trivia for kids is a way to kill time or to entertain the children. However Bible trivia does a lot more than entertain.  It reinforces what the children have already learned, and it teaches them more.  Some research shows that when kids are presented facts in competition, they learn more quickly and retain more subject matter than through school memorization or wrote.  Bible Trivia is a fun way to prepare kids for real life with stories from real-life history.

Even Preschoolers Can Compete at Bible Trivia

Bible activity
To many people fun Bible trivia for kids is a way to kill time or to entertain the children. However Bible trivia does a lot more than entertain.

You can start teaching kids by using Bible trivia at a very young age.  Most preschoolers who regularly attend Sunday school know the stories of Noah, Jonah, David & Goliath and a few others.  Doing Bible trivia questions with kids will help prepare them for the types of testing that await them in school—and in a fun way.  Bible trivia contests also provide an opportunity to reinforce the exciting details of what they’ve learned in Sunday school. 

Finally, trivia for kids provides a great opportunity to compare biblical heroes with people of today.  Show them a trivia question that asks, “which Bible heroes were called by God and asked in terror, “why me??”  That’s a great opportunity to share how ancient heroes were just as scared as we are to do brave things. Trivia questions can help kids believe that God can use them too!

Here’s an easy bible trivia contest  

Below is a Bible Trivia Contest for kids as young as four but will work for those new to our faith of any age.  If you use it remember praise, praise, praise!  Praise for correct answers is just as good as a prize (thought prizes wouldn’t hurt either)!

Quiz

(Is the correct answer A, B. or C.)

1.  Who was the baby whose mother placed him in a basket and hid him in the bulrushes?

A.  Cain.    B. Moses.   C. Daniel.

2.  What did God tell Noah to build?

        A.  A statue.   B.  A chariot.   C.  An Ark.

3.  To whom did God give the Ten Commandments?

        A. Moses.  B. Saul.  C. King Solomon.

4.  What sign did God give to Noah after the flood?.  

A.  A star.   B.  An angel.  C. A rainbow.

5.  Who slew the giant Goliath?.  

        A. David.  B. Gideon.  C. Sampson. 

6.  Which of these men wanted to know, “Why me?” when God called on them to do something?

        A.  Moses and Gideon   B.  Jonah and Saul.  3.  All of them.

7.  How did David kill the giant?

        A.  With his slingshot.   B.  With his sword.   C.  With poison.  

8.  When the Israelites were hungry in the desert, how did God feed them?  

A. With Burnt Offerings.  B.  With Manna that fell from the sky.  C.  He filled their nets with fish.  

9.  In which book of the Bible is God not mentioned even once?

A. Micha.  B.  Esther.  C.  Malachi. 

10.   What happened to Jonah when God asked him to do something and he tried to run away?  

        A. He was thrown into the lions den.   B. He was swallowed by a whale.  C. He was thrown into the firey furnace.

 The Bible has an endless number of subjects and characters that can be turned into trivia contests for kids.  The Ten Commandments, the beatitudes, the disciples, the New Testament, The Christmas story, the Easter story and many others can be learned easily…especially if there is lots of praise and a prize at the end! 

Quiz Answers

(With the correct answer underlined and in bold.)

1.  Who was the baby whose mother placed him in a basket and hid him in the bulrushes?

A.  Cain,    B. Moses,   C, Daniel

2.  What did God tell Noah to build?

        A.  A statue.   B.  A chariot.   C.  An Ark.

3.  To whom did God give the Ten Commandments?

        A. Moses, B. Saul, C. King Solomon?

4.  What sign did God give to Noah after the flood?.  

A.  A star.   B.  An angel.  C. A rainbow.

5.  Who slew the giant Goliath?.  

        A. David.  B. Gideon.  C. Sampson 

6.  Which of these men wanted to know, “Why me? when God called on them to do something?

        A.  Moses and Gideon   B.  Jonah and Saul.  3.  All of them.

7.  How did David kill the giant?

        A. With his slingshot.   B.  With his sword.   C.  With poison.  

8.  When the Israelites were hungry, how did God feed them.  

A. With Burnt Offerings.  B.  With Manna that fell from the sky.  C.  He filled their nets with fish.  

  1. In which book of the Bible is God not mentioned once?

A. Micha.  B.  Esther.  C.  Malachi. 

10.   What happened to Jonah when God asked him to do something and he tried to run away?  

        A. He was thrown into the lions den.   B. He was swallowed by a whale.  C. He was thrown into the firey furnace.

Teen Bible Study Ideas

The most exciting Teen Bible study ideas come directly from the newspaper or news reports.  It’s probably best that they do, because these stories are at the top of the teenager’s list of concerns and deal with issues they are facing every day.  

Teenagers still have one foot in their childhood and one in adulthood, and since most have spent three fourths of their lives in school, they’ve had enough.  If they can find a way to avoid another class, they’ll jump at the chance and there will be no one to attend the Bible study.  Before you start looking for teen Bible study ideas, you must accomplish three things:

  • Grab the teenager’s attention.
  • Hold their attention. 
  • Make them want to come back for the next session.  

How do you grab a teenager’s attention.  

There is one crucial difference between an adult audience and a teenage one.  Adults are willing to give a speaker a chance, but if you let a teenager think for one minute that this is another lesson, you will lose him before you start.  The first rule for teenagers is to avoid, at all costs, a classroom atmosphere.

Instead of chairs in a row and the speaker at the front of the room, use a round table with a seat for the discussion leader among the students.   Have sodas available, and a snack to which they can help themselves.  If you have a portable microwave that you could bring into the room to pop popcorn, you have won one battle.  Who ever heard of a classroom that smelled like a movie theater? If you don’t have a portable microwave, a bag of popcorn from the supermarket is better than nothing.  

Open with an icebreaker

 

teen bible study
Try using an icebreaker to get your teen bible study started

An icebreaker is a trick that most public speakers use to win an audience. It consists of an antidote or a story that will make the audience laugh, and if it pokes fun at the speaker, you’ve won them, and that’s exactly what you want.  

Make them want to come back next week. 

You can’t make teenagers do anything, but you can make them want to do something, and this is where your preparation and presentation become paramount.  The secret, strange as it may seem, is not to lecture and to speak as little as possible.  The magic formula is to let the teenagers do the talking.  Ask questions.  Their answers  will reveal the facts far better than any lecture.

How do you choose topics for a teen Bible study?  

If it’s been in the news, it’s a hot topic, and bullies and bullying have certainly made the news.   There are even commercials that stress the importance of kindness and passing it on. 

Going online and google-ing the heading, News articles about bullies in schools, will bring up ten pages of examples ranging from the Fox News report on March 29, 2010: Nine Charged in Bullying of Massachusetts Teen Who Killed Herself, to the CBS news report on April 4, 2010, Bullying: Do Schools Need a New approach?

Other great teen issues include how to abstain from drugs, drinking and sex. “Just say no” and other mottos don’t really cut it.  Cite examples of kids who don’t succumb in tough situations, and details of the means with which they did it.  As with any great lesson, greatness lies in the details.  Those subjects alone could take up a couple of seasons, but there’s also modesty, the value of planning ahead (they notoriously don’t), getting to know Jesus as a Person and not a religion, the hazards of gossip.  Finally, as most teens love a great suspense tail, theirs is a great age to introduce the apocalyptic books and how they may relate to today’s events. 

How do we tie topics into a Bible Study?

This is where the teacher’s preparation is crucial.  Scriptures and parables that lead the teenagers into a discussion related to the subject will make or break your Bible Study, so have a generous supply of these tools at your fingertips. 

Bringing in scripture always sows seeds.  It also makes the Bible a relevant and powerful book as opposed to an archaic, dusty old book that their parents read.  There  are so many great web sites including Biblios.com and Bible Gateway to lead teachers to great scriptures.  If a teacher simply types “[issue] scriptures,” such as “teenage drinking scriptures,” you often come up with a host of worthy articles to scour.

If a problem in your area made the local news, but not the national, be sure to include it in your study.  Teenagers, while taking that final step to adulthood, need guidance more than ever.  They are still young, impressionable and inexperienced, so your discussions along with Biblical reinforcement can play a leading role  while they are choosing the direction of their lives.  Be sure to include such a topic in your Teen Bible Study Ideas.

Bible Games from Board Games?

All kids love board games, and all teachers love Bible games.  Combining the two may be an inexpensive and fun way to enhance learning  in Sunday school.  You can take regular board games and make them into fun Bible games with a few pieces of masking tape, a marker pen, and a few creative instructions!

Let’s start with the easy ones:  Parcheesi and its American compatriot, Sorry.  Parcheesi is known as the national game of India, though it was designed during the Depression in the United Kingdom.  Parcheesi likenesses such as Sorry are often the first games of strategy that kids are introduced to.  After rolling the dice, kids’ pieces may “slide” across a number of squares at once, and the idea is to get back to the starting point.

Many popular board games, like Monopoly and Sorry, can be easily converted to Bible games!

Introducing the Bible via Sorry or Parcheesi will bring kids into a new version of fun with a game with which they are already familiar.  To combine it with the Bible, tape certain Bible verses onto the board, verses that you’ve been studying in class.  Just tape the book, chapter and number, such as John 3:16.  Have kids guess the words, “God so loved the world that he gave his only begotten son…”  If they need help, put all the verses and their contents on a companion piece that you tape up to the wall or lay on the table.  Kids should be able to match up the verse they land on with the wording.  Suddenly Parcheesi and its likenesses can help kids memorize scripture!

Monopoly is another board game kids have loved for decades.  This time, use your masking tape to cover names like Connecticut Avenue, and put down places like Nineveh of Jonah’s ilk or Canaan, where Abraham settled.  Visit sites listing “places of the Bible.”  Instead of buying them for outright money kids must guess who lived there.  Again, wall charts can help them by providing needed clues.  Since the Community Chest and Chance cards teach charity as well as business principles, you can leave them as they are.  Free Parking can become “Free Salvation,” and “Go to Jail” and “Jail” can become “Prison of Your Own Sins.”

Scrabble is great for Biblical studies, as kids can spell out the names of places or people of the Bible.  Provide a Master List on the wall—words with 3, 4, 5 letters, all the way up to 10 letters.  You can find lists of “places in the Bible” or “people in the Bible” by surfing.

Bible Trivia is easy and relevant to any Sunday school lesson.  You can use your own games of just by putting your own questions and answers on index cards, and having kids earn points by answering correctly!  No board needed!    Apply this to any Sunday school lesson if you want to fill time and reinforce information afterward.

Barrel of Monkeys will increase dexterity while reinforcing Bible knowledge.  One way to use the monkey is to give children a verse from the Bible to memorize.  As they say each word, they then qualify themselves to pick up a monkey.  Example:  God.  So.  Loved.  The.  World.  He.  Gave.  His. Only. Begotten.  Son.  John.  3.  16.  All the children can chant the words while each takes a turn stringing monkeys.

Dominoes is also great for teaching Bible verses—given a few strips of masking tape.  Cover the dots with one word of a Bible verse such as Psalm 1:1:  “Blessed is the man who does not walk in the way of the ungodly, nor stand in the path of sinners, nor sit where the scornful and mockers gather.”  Throw all the taped dominoes into a basket, then spread it out on the table after repeating the verse a few times.  Have the kids connect the words in the proper order.

Games such as these have lasted the decades because they are inherently fun, and no amount of electronic games and sophisticated new additions are introduced to the world of “play.”  By using them in Sunday school classes, you are promoting an important message:  Christianity also lasts the ages and stays fun, no matter how much sophistication is added to the world.  Though he adapts to the times, Jesus is fun and relevant yesterday, today and forever (Hebrews 13:8).